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Maher Zain’s Insha Allah by Mike Harris

Maher Zain’s Insha Allah by Mike Harris

David Knight - 24th June 2010

Mike Harris has visualized the message of hope and redemption in Egyptian star Maher Zain's song Insha Allah. It's a powerful film, beautifully shot by August Jakobsson using Photosonics and Red One, and it was filmed and recorded in four languages (this being the English-language version).

Mike Harris has visualized the message of hope and redemption in Egyptian star Maher Zain's song Insha Allah. It's a powerful film, beautifully shot by August Jakobsson using Photosonics and Red One, and it was filmed and recorded in four languages (this being the English-language version). <em>Mike Harris on making the video for Maher Zain's Insha Allah</em> "I wanted to focus on details of human emotion, to capture the moment of change from distress to discovering inner peace, a moment of divine intervention. Suffering is found everywhere and it seemed a natural choice to create scenes that could be from many different places in the world. "I decided to bring this wide range of scenes into Maher's performance space so that they appeared in front of him as manifestations of his thoughts. Although we were in effect creating glimpses of people's lives, I wrote back-stories for the characters, which served as a point of reference for the actor's performances, art direction, lighting, styling and make-up. I think this cohesive approach worked well. "Photosonic slow motion was the perfect technique to engage the viewer to focus on the intimacy of human expressions, to really draw people in. We did very detailed castings, as finding the right range of cast who could deliver authentic performances was key. Slow motion reveals all and I am pleased that the actors did such a great job"

Mike Harris on making the video for Maher Zain's Insha Allah

Mike Harris has visualized the message of hope and redemption in Egyptian star Maher Zain's song Insha Allah. It's a powerful film, beautifully shot by August Jakobsson using Photosonics and Red One, and it was filmed and recorded in four languages (this being the English-language version). <em>Mike Harris on making the video for Maher Zain's Insha Allah</em> "I wanted to focus on details of human emotion, to capture the moment of change from distress to discovering inner peace, a moment of divine intervention. Suffering is found everywhere and it seemed a natural choice to create scenes that could be from many different places in the world. "I decided to bring this wide range of scenes into Maher's performance space so that they appeared in front of him as manifestations of his thoughts. Although we were in effect creating glimpses of people's lives, I wrote back-stories for the characters, which served as a point of reference for the actor's performances, art direction, lighting, styling and make-up. I think this cohesive approach worked well. "Photosonic slow motion was the perfect technique to engage the viewer to focus on the intimacy of human expressions, to really draw people in. We did very detailed castings, as finding the right range of cast who could deliver authentic performances was key. Slow motion reveals all and I am pleased that the actors did such a great job"

"I wanted to focus on details of human emotion, to capture the moment of change from distress to discovering inner peace, a moment of divine intervention. Suffering is found everywhere and it seemed a natural choice to create scenes that could be from many different places in the world.

Mike Harris has visualized the message of hope and redemption in Egyptian star Maher Zain's song Insha Allah. It's a powerful film, beautifully shot by August Jakobsson using Photosonics and Red One, and it was filmed and recorded in four languages (this being the English-language version). <em>Mike Harris on making the video for Maher Zain's Insha Allah</em> "I wanted to focus on details of human emotion, to capture the moment of change from distress to discovering inner peace, a moment of divine intervention. Suffering is found everywhere and it seemed a natural choice to create scenes that could be from many different places in the world. "I decided to bring this wide range of scenes into Maher's performance space so that they appeared in front of him as manifestations of his thoughts. Although we were in effect creating glimpses of people's lives, I wrote back-stories for the characters, which served as a point of reference for the actor's performances, art direction, lighting, styling and make-up. I think this cohesive approach worked well. "Photosonic slow motion was the perfect technique to engage the viewer to focus on the intimacy of human expressions, to really draw people in. We did very detailed castings, as finding the right range of cast who could deliver authentic performances was key. Slow motion reveals all and I am pleased that the actors did such a great job"

"I decided to bring this wide range of scenes into Maher's performance space so that they appeared in front of him as manifestations of his thoughts. Although we were in effect creating glimpses of people's lives, I wrote back-stories for the characters, which served as a point of reference for the actor's performances, art direction, lighting, styling and make-up. I think this cohesive approach worked well.

Mike Harris has visualized the message of hope and redemption in Egyptian star Maher Zain's song Insha Allah. It's a powerful film, beautifully shot by August Jakobsson using Photosonics and Red One, and it was filmed and recorded in four languages (this being the English-language version). <em>Mike Harris on making the video for Maher Zain's Insha Allah</em> "I wanted to focus on details of human emotion, to capture the moment of change from distress to discovering inner peace, a moment of divine intervention. Suffering is found everywhere and it seemed a natural choice to create scenes that could be from many different places in the world. "I decided to bring this wide range of scenes into Maher's performance space so that they appeared in front of him as manifestations of his thoughts. Although we were in effect creating glimpses of people's lives, I wrote back-stories for the characters, which served as a point of reference for the actor's performances, art direction, lighting, styling and make-up. I think this cohesive approach worked well. "Photosonic slow motion was the perfect technique to engage the viewer to focus on the intimacy of human expressions, to really draw people in. We did very detailed castings, as finding the right range of cast who could deliver authentic performances was key. Slow motion reveals all and I am pleased that the actors did such a great job"

"Photosonic slow motion was the perfect technique to engage the viewer to focus on the intimacy of human expressions, to really draw people in. We did very detailed castings, as finding the right range of cast who could deliver authentic performances was key. Slow motion reveals all and I am pleased that the actors did such a great job"

Watch 'Maher Zain’s Insha Allah by Mike Harris' here

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David Knight - 24th June 2010

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Credits

Production/Creative

Director
Mike Harris
Producer
James Youngs
Production Company
Gas&Electric
1st AD
Martin Serene

Camera

Director of Photography
August Jakobsson

Art

Art Director
Julian Nagal

Editorial

Editor
Brendan McNamee

Agent

Director's Representation
Debs Ramsey

Commission

Commissioner
Bara Kherigi

David Knight - 24th June 2010

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