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VV Brown’s Game Over by Harvey B Brown

VV Brown’s Game Over by Harvey B Brown

David Knight - 27th Aug 2009

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits.

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again...

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

Harvey on the making of....

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE!

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials.

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects.

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane.

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission.

VV Brown meets HB Brown, and they go to town with the outfits. On a distinctly martial theme as it happens. In fact, it looks like they raided 'Military Uniforms, early to late 19th century' room at the V&amp;A for this one. That'll be Harvey drawing upon his fashion masters degree again... <strong><em>Harvey on the making of....</em></strong> "I love VV's music, not just her own material but also the stuff that she has written for other people. She wrote Denial for the Sugababes - and I shot the video. Game Over is about being strong and standing up for yourself when a relationship is going bad, and if you are going to call the shots like that we agreed that you have to look FIERCE! "We both have a serious interest in fashion, and that was the thrust of the video. We wanted to create some amazing couture looks (on a budget... as always) and so we had to be very creative about materials. "I had a fantastic close-knit team - myself, VV Brown, the amazing stylist Susie Coulthard and the help of award winning lettering artist Alison Carmichael. We also were lucky enough to be able to borrow some pieces from an artist called Walter Rafe (Walterworks) who makes clothes out of everyday objects. "We ended up making things from paper and fake hair and sellotape as well as using vintage pieces for Alison to write all over. Luckily VV Brown is the kind of artist who can work a paper bag into a hot look. The fabrics were deliberately chosen to translate nicely on film, like rubber and scrunched cellophane. "Making VV a soldier or even as strong as a 9ft brick wall. Strength was always fused with beauty, and even vulnerability (that was the thinking behind the ballerina outfit with one shoe). The choreography and post were kept simple and were used to give the sense that VV Brown is a one woman army marching on a mission. "The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

"The shoot day consisted of lots of quick changes, a lot of rushing and drama, and then the pressure of getting each outfit shot in one or two takes before moving on. Adrian Wilde and his crew would be setting up the lighting for the next shot and then VV would appear in her new amazing outfit making an entrance from behind her changing screen. Each new outfit was met with applause and wolf whistles really creating that fashion show vibe."

Watch 'VV Brown’s Game Over by Harvey B Brown' here

David Knight - 27th Aug 2009

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Credits

Production/Creative

Director
Harvey B Brown
Producer
Scott Clarke
Production Company
Crossroads Films
Executive Producer
Trudy Bellinger

Camera

Director of Photography
Adrian Wild

Art

Art Director
Ed Butcher

Wardrobe

Stylist
Susie Coulthard

Choreography

Choreographer
Ian Mills

Grading

Colourist
Simone Grattarola

Commission

Commissioner
Tamara Brookes

David Knight - 27th Aug 2009

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