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Jamie T’s Sticks & Stones by Adam Powell

David Knight - 28th May 2009

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for Fire Fire a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same joie de vivre and fire in the belly.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up).

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks & Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed.

It's going down in Hampton Wick, as Jamie T and Adam Powell look for trouble in SW London's leafy 'burbs. This is Adam's second video for Jamie, following his riotous, lo-fi vid for <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watchv=MO81BSx7mFA">Fire Fire</a> a few months back. Sticks, albeit a bit more polished, has the same <em>joie de vivre</em> and fire in the belly. <strong><em>Adam Powell on making the video for Jamie T's Sticks And Stones</em></strong> "The first Jamie T video came about after months of discussion about what Jamie and I liked and didn't like about music videos. Jamie's music has that lo-fi edgy almost punk quality, and this kind of innocence and honesty that always reminds me of the way we used to make skate videos, just friends messing about and having a good time doing what they love. That's kind of the attitude I approached both projects with and it seems to fit quite well. "With Fire Fire the main aim was to throw out the rules, shoot what we wanted when we wanted. Jamie and I decided that our favourite videos all put fun and energy first - so we threw a party, dressed up to race wheelbarrows and shot the performance around Jamie's house/studio. There was also a section shot backstage at a Rancid show in Brixton which was a lot of fun (although probably not much fun for Rancid's crew, I'm pretty sure they hated us running about whilst they were setting up). "Jamie is great to work with, he has a very clear idea of what he likes and what he doesn't like and we pretty much always see eye to eye. When we first started I think he was a little wary of performing in front of the camera, but we pretty much just turned the whole thing into a massive piss take, I think it helped we didn't take every little thing so seriously. "For Fire Fire it was just me and Jamie running around with a video camera but with Sticks &amp; Stones things were a little more professional. At first I was worried working with a crew would crush all the fun out of the process, and we would struggle to keep that lo-fi vibe but the guys from RSA were great and Jamie's friends were funny as hell so the whole process worked out well. "It also helped that the set wasn't too controlled, I think the guys were given vague instructions to 'have fun' and to occasionally throw stones at our DoP and they just kinda fell into a natural rhythm of hanging out, drinking and taking the piss whilst Jamie performed. "And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

"And yes, one of the stones hit the camera, and yes, everyone shit themselves - especially the guy that threw the stone. But we were VERY lucky and it somehow didn't do ANY damage and no one had to die. Good times. :) "

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David Knight - 28th May 2009

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Adam Powell
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David Knight - 28th May 2009

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