User Accounts

Nokia’s Manifesto viral by Diamond Dogs

Nokia’s Manifesto viral by Diamond Dogs

David Knight - 25th Nov 2008

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model.

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure...

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

"This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people.

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

"We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves.

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

"To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles.

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

"The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD.

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

"We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased
with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay]

Their background in music, and their reputation for achieving the apparently insurmountable, meant that Diamond Dogs (that's Phil Sansom and Olly Williams) were ideal candidates to make this kinetic viral to launch the new Nokia phone that may possibly revolutionise the music industry's business model. And they did the music here too, while at the same time beating the living crap out of the basic Consequences concept, then adding some animation for good measure... <strong><em>Phil Sansom and Olly Williams on making the Nokia Manifesto viral</em></strong> "This was our first job with Wieden Kennedy working through Dept A [HSI London's animation department] which was great. The only problem was that we only had a week to get it all together. The idea was to put across how we are changing as music consumers, that we now buy tracks rather than albums and are becoming a generation of playlist people. "We wanted to show the different styles of music mixing together through a visual experience, a bit like a mixtape of fashion and animation styles. We needed a large collection of material from all eras of music so we decided to try and make it all ourselves. "To get all the different looks and feels of music fashion styles through the ages we set up a simultaneous stills and live action shoot using a selection of models styled up in different outfits and art directed sets. All of the images except the Bollywood stuff were all shoot by us - we even raided our iPhoto libraries for some authentic festival images. The music was equally important, so we decided to make that too, recording my drums live in a studio, then messing around with it so it sounded like a mish-mash of musical styles. "The images we shot were then overlaid and spliced together in Final Cut and After Effects to make patterns using strips reminiscent of playlist lines. The manifesto was then added in over the top on printed strips as animated sequences that interacted with the images. Then it was all beat-cut to the music on my laptop (which was definitely feeling the strain of working in HD. "We spent a few nights sleeping under our desks in the office but what's new there It's a bit like a visual slap in the face, an onslaught that doesn't let up. Nokia and the Wiedens were very pleased<br/>with the result so we consider it a job well done."[/pay] <strong>Watch: <a href="http://www.depta.co.uk/media.cfmidMedia=116">Quicktime movie</a></strong>

Watch: Quicktime movie

David Knight - 25th Nov 2008

Tags

  • Director's notes
  • Virals

Popular content

Feedback

Problem with this page? Let us know

Credits

Production/Creative

Director
Diamond Dogs
Producer
Sam Hope
Production Company
Dept. A

Camera

Director of Photography
Will Bex

Agent

Director's Representation
Wieden & Kennedy London

Misc

Photographer
Thomas Lovelock
Flame
Dan Lorenzini

David Knight - 25th Nov 2008

Related Content

Industry News