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Gosling shoots first RED video in UK for Ansell’s Free

Gosling shoots first RED video in UK for Ansell’s Free

David Knight - 31st Jan 2008

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."

But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.
"There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

"The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones."

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money."

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."
Looks like it could be a RED future.

On one level Stuart Gosling's video for Universal Classics and Jazz artist Jonathan Ansell is a conventionally slick and cinematic showcase for the ex-G4 singer's solo debut. But it actually could be a pioneering piece of work. It's almost certainly the first music video in the UK shot with the revolutionary RED camera system. The RED camera claims to offer twice the resolution of HD-cam, plus greater latitude than HD in terms of light sensitivity. It's sensor is as big as a frame of 35mm, so the camera can also take 35mm film lenses and replicate film-like depth of field when the camera is shooting at 4K. And Hollywood has already picked up on it: Peter Jackson's latest movie Crossing The Line, was shot on RED prototypes. What is interesting, and somewhat controversial, about RED is that it has not been developed by a recognised camera manufacturer, but by Oakley, the sunglasses and sportswear company. Gosling had his first outings with this new technology shooting a short film and a commercial before suggesting it to Universal commissioner Cynthia Lole for the Ansell job. The shoot, at the historic Coronet cinema in London's Notting Hill, went very well: Gosling shot two commercials as well as the promo in a single 12-hour day. "It was a very fast day and I treated the camera just as I would a 35mm camera. My lighting and exposure and composition methods were exactly the same, and as usual I relied mainly on my instincts to move quickly and not shoot multiple takes."<br/><br/>But the uniqueness of the RED cam also posed a problem: the camera records to files rather than tape, and it has its own file system which happens to be incompatible to the Mystika system used by many post houses, including Concrete.<br/> "There was a lot of scratching of heads and jiggery-pokery to make it work," says David Cox, MD of Concrete Post and the visual effects artist on the job. And it was Cox who came up with the answer: REDCINE, a programme (still in beta) which takes RED files and translates them into the industry standard. The 4K and 2K files from the camera were "digitally developed" at Concrete, then all of the post took place under the one roof, starting at Metropolis, the editing house now situated at Concrete, where Guy Morley edited the clip. Cox then took Morley's cut into one of Concrete's Mistika HD suites for the final online and colour grade. "The images from the RED camera were great to grade from," Cox reveals. "They initially had a flat feeling similar to film that had been scanned. However, they contained a rich depth of colour that allowed very accurate colour picking, and this is important for music videos where it is common to apply a different treatment to the artist's skin tones." Concrete are so excited by the RD camera's potential that they have established a strategic alliance with Axis Films, the Shepperton-based HD camera rental house which provided on-shoot support and accessories for the Ansell video, and who are now investing in a couple of RED cameras. The two companies plan to provide an integrated shoot-to-post production support for the camera's subsequent outings in the UK. "Clients can have an end-to-end solution," says Cox. Meanwhile, Stuart Gosling has now taken the RED camera to Australia where he is shooting a post-heavy video for Vanessa Amorossi. "This camera is perfect for the job," he says. "We'll be working for a month in Sydney with big team of people who all need instant access to the data. Having all the data in such hi resolution means that everyone has them immediately after the shoot and post flow stays in the digital realm. If we shot on film we would constantly be going back to the analogue world, where most operations take time and money." Gosling is under illusions that the RED camera is perfect, but most seem to be associated with being a new piece of kit. "There are problems - overheats and crashes, monitoring is difficult and not many experienced focus pullers are up to speed yet. That puts more pressure on me to deal with technical issues rather than the creative ones. But we are all working out the bugs."<br/> Looks like it could be a RED future. <em>? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London</em>

? Stuart Gosling is represented for music videos in the UK by Debs Herbert at Y-I London

Watch 'Gosling shoots first RED video in UK for Ansell’s Free' here

David Knight - 31st Jan 2008

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Credits

Production/Creative

Producer
Gail Davey
Production Company
Panda Pictures/Davey Inc.

Editorial

Editor
Guy Morley

Grading

Colourist
David Cox

Commission

Commissioner
Cynthia Lole

David Knight - 31st Jan 2008

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