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Fujiya & Miyagi’s Sore Thumb by Wade Shotter

Fujiya & Miyagi’s Sore Thumb by Wade Shotter

David Knight - 16th Dec 2008

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for Knickerbocker earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya & Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&M video yet.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

Okay, there are a few post effects in there too...

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya & Miyagi's Sore Thumb

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue.

Following his award-winning video for Ankle Injuries and acclaimed video for <a href="http://www.promonews.tv/wordpress/wp-admin/%E2%80%9D">Knickerbocker</a> earlier this year, here comes Wade Shotter's third video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi. Technically it could be his most ingenious F&amp;M video yet. Apparently no computer graphics were used, and it was all done in-camera - which is somewhat hard to swallow as the band become wire block-men playing wire-block instruments in a wire block world. Based on early Eighties computer game vector animation, the simple computer graphics really were built for real, by Steve Gallagher and his team at Block9 under Wade's direction - as he explains below. Okay, there are a few post effects in there too... <em><strong>Wade Shotter on making the video for Fujiya &amp; Miyagi's Sore Thumb</strong></em> "The initial inspiration for the promo came from the idea of taking the simple visual language of early 80's wireframe/vector animation - which exists as a well known but purely digital format - and re-inventing it by building real physical wireframe structures. "It followed that every graphic and detail should be made and shot in-camera to adhere to the same theme. Even simple background/foreground plates with no movement were blown up, painted or printed out and re-shot in studio. "The band performance was simply shot against black with a black suit so all that remained were their wireframe exoskeletons and faces. "The miniatures ended up looking almost too realistic in places, so it was important to include a very human element to the project which materialised in the form of 'purposefully bad puppetry'. "The tank miniatures were simply dragged across screen with black cotton and their movements were deliberately inconsistent and jerky. To get across the 'real' nature of the promo, the wireframe models were made to look imperfect and a little wonky with unfinished edges and unsightly blobs of glue. "Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

"Steve, the Block9 team and I worked for six days straight to make all of the props, costumes and backgrounds for the shoot. Filming took place at Block9's studio in East London."

David Knight - 16th Dec 2008

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Director
Wade Shotter
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Paul Carter
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Steve Annis

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David Knight - 16th Dec 2008

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